Interview with Anthems of Gomorrah

Today, we sat down with Anthems of Gomorrah to talk about their inspiration to write music, music listened to growing up and much more!

Interview:

What is your inspiration to write your music? Is it your
surroundings?

 

TK: For me, it’s things like history and culture. I also enjoy worldbuilding. Creating lore and stories is a huge aspect of my song writing. Obviously, fantasy plays a huge part in it as well. Tolkien, Moorcock, Martin, Rothfuss – Read them all, love them all. As far as where we live, I supposed it is inspirational from an urban perspective. When we aren’t writing songs based on fantasy, much of it centers around a disdain for modern society. We live in a densely populated area so it’s easy to get inspired for that kind of song writing.

What type of music did you listen to growing up?

TK: I grew up on southern rock and the normal radio music of the 90’s. All of it was inspirational. For as long as I can remember, I’ve wanted to be a performer or musician. I also grew up with Thin Lizzy, Bad Company, Journey, AC/DC, Ozzy, etc etc… but it wasn’t until middle school that I really branched out from the alternative rock bands to heavier and heavier genres of metal. There was no looking back after that.

Is there someone you looked up as a hero?

TK: There’s so many people who could fit this criterion. I don’t want to choose just one person but I suppose I’ll say Quorthon from Bathory, and not the reasons you might think. It has nothing to do with him status as a pioneer for the first wave of black metal or anything like that but the fact that he wasn’t afraid to do everything by himself. He had a vision, a standard for everything he created and I connect with that in a great way, especially after having completed the first ‘Aelvica’ album by myself.

If you weren’t a musician, would you be doing today?

TK: Probably living an extremely bored, unhappy life. Music is my passion, my hobby and my escape. I don’t what else I’d do to be honest.

What advice do you have for our fans out there that want to create
music?

TK: Do it. Don’t be intimidated by it or by your skills as a musician, just sit down and do it. It’s not hard and it’s not ridiculously expensive to get started either. Get an interface, get some software and start recording. Record everything, all your ideas, riffs, vocal parts, whatever. I hope you come to enjoy the catharsis of musical expression, and the pride and sense of accomplishment when you complete something. That’s the best feeling in the world.

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